Savings will not prevent Social Security disability benefits

Sometimes a topic suddenly starts to generate questions. The following question came up three separate times while I was teaching recently. Perhaps it will interest you too.  

Q: How much money can I have in savings before my Social Security disability stops?  

A: Your savings will not stop Social Security disability benefits. Whether rich or poor, your financial value does not matter for Social Security retirement, survivors or disability benefits.  

Work is at the base of all Social Security benefits, not financial need. Requirements vary with type of benefit but the person whose Social Security number record is involved needs enough work to be insured or benefits are not payable. Learn more about Social Security benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov 

If you receive Social Security through your own record, then your work record was used. If you receive benefits through another person’s record, such as a child eligible through a parent, then that person had to have enough work. 

What can confuse people on this topic is that the Social Security Administration is responsible for more than Social Security retirement, survivors and disability benefits.  

Eligibility for the low-income Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program does include income and resource requirements. SSI can provide benefits to those over age 65 as well as blind or disabled children or adults. SSI is very different from Social Security, but both programs are administered by the Social Security Administration. 

People receiving SSI must stay below certain income and resource levels to remain eligible. Resources include savings and other items of financial value that you own and can turn into cash but not everything you own is counted toward the resource limit. For an eligible individual the total level of counted resources is $2,000. For an eligible couple, this amount is $3,000. These resource levels will continue for 2015. If exceeded, the person is no longer eligible.

Some types of resources that do not count toward these totals are the house you live in and household goods, usually one vehicle, some insurance policies and some burial funds. This is not a complete list. An overview of Supplemental Security Income resources is here 

Since Social Security and SSI are completely different programs, one person can receive both of them if the separate requirements are met.

In summary, if a person receives both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), his or her savings or other resources will not stop Social Security benefits but they can end SSI benefits.

 

 

 

 

Annual SSA disability report released

The Annual Statistical Report on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, 2013 was released this week.

This annual report provides program and demographic information about the people who receive Social Security disability benefits—disabled workers, disabled widow(er)s, and disabled adult children. Topics covered include beneficiaries in current payment status; benefits awarded, withheld, and terminated; geographic distributions; Social Security beneficiaries who receive Supplemental Security Income; and the income of disabled beneficiaries.

Following is from the Highlights section of the report:

Size and Scope of the Social Security Disability Program

Disability benefits were paid to just over 10.2 million people.

Awards to disabled workers (868,965) accounted for over 90 percent of awards to all disabled beneficiaries (965,190).

In December, payments to disabled beneficiaries totaled about $11.2 billion.

Benefits were terminated for 769,171 disabled workers.

Supplemental Security Income payments were another source of income for about one out of seven disabled beneficiaries.  (Note: not everyone receives Social Security through his or her own work.  For example, family benefits to disabled children or disabled widows or widowers are possible. 

Profile of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries

Workers accounted for the largest share of disabled beneficiaries (87.4 percent).

Average age was 53.

Men represented under 52 percent.

Mental disorders was the diagnosis for about a third.

Average monthly benefit received was $1,146.42.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments were another source of income for about one out of eight.  

Should Mom give me the money?

Q: I am 15 and receive Social Security, which goes to my Mom. Should she should give me the money? 

A: When a person younger than age 18 receives Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the payment is almost always sent to an adult on their behalf rather than directly to the child. This adult is called the representative payee and it is his or her responsibility to direct the management of the funds. 

Representative payees are also appointed for adults who are incapable of managing their benefits. Payees are often family members but can be different people or even an organization. 

In the booklet A Guide for Representative Payees, a new payee is instructed in how funds should be used and how funds not immediately needed should be held for the future. Payees are told about required reports to Social Security about the funds. Representative payee instructions go into detail about how funds are to be used.  

Should your Mom give you the money? Not directly but the funds must be used for you. Just handing the benefit money to you could mean that she was not exercising proper control of the funds in your best interest. 

A key representative payee responsibility is to know beneficiary needs so that the Social Security or SSI funds can be best used for the person’s care and well-being, in particular making sure that day-to-day food and shelter needs are met. Having basic needs of food, shelter and clothing met indicate benefits are used for you even if you do not directly handle the money.  

Social Security benefits for children might continue or end at age 18. If they continue past age 18, the child often starts to receive them directly, without having a representative payee. Consider asking your Mom to share or create a budget with you. This would show you how the funds are used while giving you practice in handling money.

Reporting possible Social Security fraud

Q: Someone I know receives Social Security disability and is working part-time. How can this be looked at without me providing my name? 

A: Social Security takes potential fraud very seriously. I will write about that in a moment but first will say a few words about this question of working and disability benefits. 

It is a wrong, but popular, assumption that people receiving disability benefits cannot have a job. 

In addition to non-medical requirements, Social Security disability or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability have a strict, work based, definition of disability and relatively few people found eligible eventually return to work at levels high enough to end benefits. Despite this, people receiving disability related benefits are encouraged by the Social Security Administration to return to work and many do on a limited basis. If you receive disability benefits and start to work, contact Social Security to report the work and learn the specific details you need to know. 

Rules are different for Social Security and SSI disability but both programs have multiple work incentives to help people return to work. Beneficiaries are required to report work activity. Social Security disability reporting requirements are here; SSI requirements here. 

Returning to the reporting fraud question, you are encouraged to do so through the Social Security Office of the Inspector General (OIG). The direct website of OIG is http://oig.ssa.gov/.  The OIG site is easily reached through the “contact us” links on the Social Security homepage, www.socialsecurity.gov. From the “contact us” page, click on “Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse.” 

The OIG website  has lots of information including some situations, with examples, that may be considered as fraud, waste or abuse against the Social Security administration. Several of these are:

1. Making false statements on claims: When people apply for Social Security Benefits, they state that all information they provide on the forms are true and correct to the best of their knowledge. If a person reports something they know is not true, it may be a crime

2. Concealing facts or events which affect eligibility for benefits: It may be considered fraud if a person makes a false statement on an application or does not tell SSA of certain facts that may affect benefits.

3. Misuse of benefits by a representative payee: When a person receiving benefits cannot handle their own financial affairs, Social Security appoints a relative, friend, or another individual or organization to handle their Social Security matters. This person or organization is called a Representative Payee and it may be a crime if a payee misuses these benefits.

4. Buying or selling counterfeit or legitimate Social Security cards.

This is not a complete list. 

To report a suspected fraud, follow the instructions here. You can do this online or in other ways. Note what information will be requested. You can remain anonymous, but that might limit an OIG investigation.

Average Social Security and SSI amounts in Sept. 2014

For September 2014, last month, following are three easily understood tables providing Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) information. These tables are online here

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a separate, low income program for the aged over 65, disabled or blind children, and disabled or blind adults that is administered by the Social Security Administration. Since SSI is completely different from Social Security, a person meeting the individual rules for each could become eligible for both programs. Income from Social Security reduces SSI amounts.

Learn more about Social Security and SSI at www.socialsecurity.gov. 

Table 1 shows the number of people, in thousands, receiving Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) divided by Social Security only, SSI only, and people receiving both. 

Table 2 shows Social Security benefit information for September 2014, separated by number of beneficiaries receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits. The number of beneficiaries is again shown in the thousands, with total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

The “notes” in table 1 explain differences in total Social Security beneficiaries shown between table 1 and table 2.

Social Security was never intended to provide full retirement income and this table emphasizes that fact. In September 2014, the average SSA retirement benefit, for the retiree only and excluding any family benefits, was $1,302.56.

Table 3 shows Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit information for September 2014, separated by number of recipients receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits. As above, the number of recipients are shown in the thousands, total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

In September 2014, the average SSI amount was $535.21.

These tables are online here in case you cannot read them clearly.

Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Coverage) Open Season & Extra Help

The Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) plan open enrollment period runs from October 15 to December 7.   

Review your existing Part D plan each year. A plan that previously fit your needs might not be your best choice now. You need a list of your medicines, including dosages and frequency, to compare plans.  Spouses can choose different plans.  

Social Security representatives cannot help you choose a Part D plan.  

Learn about Part D at the Medicare website, www.medicare.gov. To find a Part D plan, go to the “Find health & drug plans” section. 

Everyone currently enrolled in Medicare can purchase a Part D prescription drug plan. Unlike Medicare Part A (Hospital) or Part B (Medical), Part D plans are purchased through private insurers. You shop for the plan that best suits your needs. Joining a Medicare prescription drug plan is voluntary and participants pay an additional monthly premium for the coverage.  

Although Social Security representatives cannot help you choose a Part D plan, the agency does administer the Extra Help portion of Part D for people with limited income and resources. 

Extra Help is an income and resource based subsidy to help pay for part of monthly premiums, annual deductibles, and prescription co-payments.  

People with Medicare and receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are automatically eligible for Extra Help and should not apply.   

Applying for the Part D Extra Help program does not enroll you in a prescription drug plan. 

Part D details and an application are at www.ssa.gov/medicare/prescriptionhelp/, or call the SSA national toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), or your local office.

Fast Facts about Social Security

Did you know that 65% of aged beneficiaries received at least half of their income from Social Security in 2012 or that 55% of adult Social Security beneficiaries in 2013 were women?

Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2014 is available online. This annual chartbook highlights data on the most important aspects of the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs—the people they serve and the benefits they provide.

From the Preface: 

Fast Facts & Figures answers the most frequently asked questions about the programs administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA). It highlights basic program data for the Social Security (retirement, survivors, and disability) and Supplemental Security Income programs.

The tables and charts illustrate the range of program beneficiaries, from the country’s oldest to its youngest citizens. In all, about 63.2 million people receive some type of benefit or assistance.  

I thought the sections about beneficiary age and sex interesting. Perhaps you will too.

Social Security & SSI payment dates for 2015

The annual schedule of payment dates for Social Security benefits and the separate Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program has remained a very popular topic ever since I started these posts. 

The 2015 schedule of payment dates is now available for viewing or downloading as a pdf file at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10031-2015.pdf 

Until 1997, all routine monthly Social Security payments arrived on the same day. No more. Now they arrive on different days of the month. Back then, “check week” was a very hectic time for local Social Security offices and financial organizations, post offices and businesses including grocery stores.  

Multiple payment dates help spread out related workloads. Widespread use of direct deposit (electronic fund transfer) has also greatly reduced the number of payment problems formerly seen with paper checks. 

Most people starting to receive Social Security since 1997 receive their routine benefits on one of four days throughout the month: on the third of the month and on the second, third and fourth Wednesdays of the month. What day will yours arrive? 

With several exceptions, Social Security payment dates now depend on the number holder’s (NH) date of birth. You are the NH if receiving Social Security on your own work record. If receiving based on the work of someone else, that person is the NH.    

Therefore, if you receive Social Security retirement or disability through your own work, the payment date is based on your birth date. A child or spouse receiving benefits on your record will also have a payment date based on your birth date.

A couple can receive Social Security payment on different days if each person is receiving his or her own retirement benefit. 

Social Security benefits are generally paid on the second Wednesday if the number holder was born within the first 10 days of a month, the third Wednesday if born within the 11-20th days and on the fourth Wednesday if born within the 21-31st days.  

Not all Social Security payment dates are birth date based. If you received Social Security before May 1997, your payment date remained the third of the month. People eligible for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) generally receive SSI on the first and their Social Security on the third of the month.  

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) funds are usually paid on the first of a month.  

As noted on the 2015 schedule, regular payment dates for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are advanced if the usual date falls on a day when financial institutions such as banks or credit unions are closed. 

One more item about payments: routine Social Security retirement, disability and survivors benefits are paid in the following month, meaning the benefit for January arrives in February. Routine Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are for the month paid so SSI arriving in February is for February.

 A link to the 2015 calendar has been added to my Areavoices homepage blogroll.

What is the disability waiting period?

Q: What is the disability waiting period? 

A: Social Security disability requirements include a waiting period of five full calendar months before entitlement to benefits can begin. Benefits are paid starting for the sixth full month after the date a disability is determined to begin. 

This date, called the onset, is when the person became disabled and not when the application was submitted or the decision made. 

For example, say someone’s Social Security disability due to illness or injury was established as beginning on September 22, 2014, the onset date. The waiting period would be the five full months of October 2014 – February 2015 with payment effective starting with March. Since Social Security payments are made in the following month, payment for March arrives in April. 

When a person files a disability application and approved near the onset date, he or she has to wait until the waiting period is completed before benefits start. If approved after the waiting period, benefits begin right away. Using the above example, if the person is approved for disability in January 2015, he or she is still in the waiting period and must finish it before benefits start. If the decision is made in May 2015, the waiting period is already completed and benefits can begin immediately. Either way, the waiting period applies. 

In addition to the Social Security disability program, the Social Security Administration is responsible for the very different, low income, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI also has disability benefits but does not have a disability waiting period. If eligible for both programs, a person might receive SSI during the Social Security waiting period. Then, when Social Security disability begins after the waiting period, the amount of those benefits will reduce or end the SSI.

 

Why SSI ?

Earlier this week, I wrote about the annual SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a national, needs based, federal assistance program administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) that provides benefits to low income people at age 65 and over, and for blind or disabled children and adults.

Is SSI part of Social Security? 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is very different and separate from the Social Security retirement, disability and survivors programs. It is not Social Security even though administered by the Social Security Administration. Depending on office size, SSA employees often work primarily with either SSI or Social Security.

Since the two programs are separate, there are many differences between them with two major ones related to how each is funded and basics of eligibility. U.S. Treasury general revenues fund SSI while Social Security is funded mainly through designated payroll taxes paid by employees and employers. SSI is an assistance program for the aged or disabled with eligibility based on financial need. Social Security provides retirement, survivors and disability benefits based on individual work.

If a person meets the separate program requirements, he or she could receive both Social Security and Supplemental Security. If not, a person might be eligible for just one or neither.

Why is there a SSI program?

The original Social Security Act of 1935 contained more than just the start of Social Security, which is in Title II of the Act. For example, funding for unemployment compensation is in Title III of the Act.   

Other sections of the Act provided federal funding for state run need-based programs of old-age assistance, aid to dependent children and aid to the blind providing the roots for the future SSI program. Despite substantial federal financing, those were essentially state programs. With only broad federal guidelines, each state was responsible for setting its own standards for determining who would receive assistance and how much they would receive. As a result, eligibility requirements and payment levels differed from state to state. Over the years, the State programs became more complex and inconsistent, with as many as 1,350 administrative agencies involved and payments varying more than 300% from State to State. 

Beginning in the early 1960s, this state-operated, federally assisted welfare system drew criticism from within and outside of government for lack of consistency. To reform this, Congress passed and President Richard Nixon approved the Social Security Amendments of 1972, (Public Law 92-603, enacted October 30, 1972), which federalized the programs and created Supplemental Security Income.  

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) provided for a uniform federal income floor of assistance, and optional state programs could supplement that floor. The new program was historic in that it shifted from the states to the federal government the responsibility for determining who would receive assistance and how much assistance they would receive. 

The Social Security Administration was chosen to administer the new SSI program because of its reputation for successful administration of the existing social insurance programs, its existing network of field offices and large-scale data processing and record-keeping operation. At the time, over 3 million people were converted from State welfare programs to SSI. 

The first Supplemental Security Income payments were issued in January 1974. I was there. 

Information for today’s post is primarily from the Social Security website history section and the Background section of the SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013 

Learn more about SSI and Social Security retirement, survivors and disability benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov. Click on the homepage “Benefits” tab to select a topic.