Average Social Security and SSI amounts in Sept. 2014

For September 2014, last month, following are three easily understood tables providing Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) information. These tables are online here

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a separate, low income program for the aged over 65, disabled or blind children, and disabled or blind adults that is administered by the Social Security Administration. Since SSI is completely different from Social Security, a person meeting the individual rules for each could become eligible for both programs. Income from Social Security reduces SSI amounts.

Learn more about Social Security and SSI at www.socialsecurity.gov. 

Table 1 shows the number of people, in thousands, receiving Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) divided by Social Security only, SSI only, and people receiving both. 

Table 2 shows Social Security benefit information for September 2014, separated by number of beneficiaries receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits. The number of beneficiaries is again shown in the thousands, with total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

The “notes” in table 1 explain differences in total Social Security beneficiaries shown between table 1 and table 2.

Social Security was never intended to provide full retirement income and this table emphasizes that fact. In September 2014, the average SSA retirement benefit, for the retiree only and excluding any family benefits, was $1,302.56.

Table 3 shows Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit information for September 2014, separated by number of recipients receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits. As above, the number of recipients are shown in the thousands, total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

In September 2014, the average SSI amount was $535.21.

These tables are online here in case you cannot read them clearly.

Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Coverage) Open Season & Extra Help

The Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) plan open enrollment period runs from October 15 to December 7.   

Review your existing Part D plan each year. A plan that previously fit your needs might not be your best choice now. You need a list of your medicines, including dosages and frequency, to compare plans.  Spouses can choose different plans.  

Social Security representatives cannot help you choose a Part D plan.  

Learn about Part D at the Medicare website, www.medicare.gov. To find a Part D plan, go to the “Find health & drug plans” section. 

Everyone currently enrolled in Medicare can purchase a Part D prescription drug plan. Unlike Medicare Part A (Hospital) or Part B (Medical), Part D plans are purchased through private insurers. You shop for the plan that best suits your needs. Joining a Medicare prescription drug plan is voluntary and participants pay an additional monthly premium for the coverage.  

Although Social Security representatives cannot help you choose a Part D plan, the agency does administer the Extra Help portion of Part D for people with limited income and resources. 

Extra Help is an income and resource based subsidy to help pay for part of monthly premiums, annual deductibles, and prescription co-payments.  

People with Medicare and receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are automatically eligible for Extra Help and should not apply.   

Applying for the Part D Extra Help program does not enroll you in a prescription drug plan. 

Part D details and an application are at www.ssa.gov/medicare/prescriptionhelp/, or call the SSA national toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), or your local office.

Fast Facts about Social Security

Did you know that 65% of aged beneficiaries received at least half of their income from Social Security in 2012 or that 55% of adult Social Security beneficiaries in 2013 were women?

Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2014 is available online. This annual chartbook highlights data on the most important aspects of the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs—the people they serve and the benefits they provide.

From the Preface: 

Fast Facts & Figures answers the most frequently asked questions about the programs administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA). It highlights basic program data for the Social Security (retirement, survivors, and disability) and Supplemental Security Income programs.

The tables and charts illustrate the range of program beneficiaries, from the country’s oldest to its youngest citizens. In all, about 63.2 million people receive some type of benefit or assistance.  

I thought the sections about beneficiary age and sex interesting. Perhaps you will too.

Social Security & SSI payment dates for 2015

The annual schedule of payment dates for Social Security benefits and the separate Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program has remained a very popular topic ever since I started these posts. 

The 2015 schedule of payment dates is now available for viewing or downloading as a pdf file at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10031-2015.pdf 

Until 1997, all routine monthly Social Security payments arrived on the same day. No more. Now they arrive on different days of the month. Back then, “check week” was a very hectic time for local Social Security offices and financial organizations, post offices and businesses including grocery stores.  

Multiple payment dates help spread out related workloads. Widespread use of direct deposit (electronic fund transfer) has also greatly reduced the number of payment problems formerly seen with paper checks. 

Most people starting to receive Social Security since 1997 receive their routine benefits on one of four days throughout the month: on the third of the month and on the second, third and fourth Wednesdays of the month. What day will yours arrive? 

With several exceptions, Social Security payment dates now depend on the number holder’s (NH) date of birth. You are the NH if receiving Social Security on your own work record. If receiving based on the work of someone else, that person is the NH.    

Therefore, if you receive Social Security retirement or disability through your own work, the payment date is based on your birth date. A child or spouse receiving benefits on your record will also have a payment date based on your birth date.

A couple can receive Social Security payment on different days if each person is receiving his or her own retirement benefit. 

Social Security benefits are generally paid on the second Wednesday if the number holder was born within the first 10 days of a month, the third Wednesday if born within the 11-20th days and on the fourth Wednesday if born within the 21-31st days.  

Not all Social Security payment dates are birth date based. If you received Social Security before May 1997, your payment date remained the third of the month. People eligible for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) generally receive SSI on the first and their Social Security on the third of the month.  

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) funds are usually paid on the first of a month.  

As noted on the 2015 schedule, regular payment dates for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are advanced if the usual date falls on a day when financial institutions such as banks or credit unions are closed. 

One more item about payments: routine Social Security retirement, disability and survivors benefits are paid in the following month, meaning the benefit for January arrives in February. Routine Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are for the month paid so SSI arriving in February is for February.

 A link to the 2015 calendar has been added to my Areavoices homepage blogroll.

What is the disability waiting period?

Q: What is the disability waiting period? 

A: Social Security disability requirements include a waiting period of five full calendar months before entitlement to benefits can begin. Benefits are paid starting for the sixth full month after the date a disability is determined to begin. 

This date, called the onset, is when the person became disabled and not when the application was submitted or the decision made. 

For example, say someone’s Social Security disability due to illness or injury was established as beginning on September 22, 2014, the onset date. The waiting period would be the five full months of October 2014 – February 2015 with payment effective starting with March. Since Social Security payments are made in the following month, payment for March arrives in April. 

When a person files a disability application and approved near the onset date, he or she has to wait until the waiting period is completed before benefits start. If approved after the waiting period, benefits begin right away. Using the above example, if the person is approved for disability in January 2015, he or she is still in the waiting period and must finish it before benefits start. If the decision is made in May 2015, the waiting period is already completed and benefits can begin immediately. Either way, the waiting period applies. 

In addition to the Social Security disability program, the Social Security Administration is responsible for the very different, low income, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI also has disability benefits but does not have a disability waiting period. If eligible for both programs, a person might receive SSI during the Social Security waiting period. Then, when Social Security disability begins after the waiting period, the amount of those benefits will reduce or end the SSI.

 

Why SSI ?

Earlier this week, I wrote about the annual SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a national, needs based, federal assistance program administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) that provides benefits to low income people at age 65 and over, and for blind or disabled children and adults.

Is SSI part of Social Security? 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is very different and separate from the Social Security retirement, disability and survivors programs. It is not Social Security even though administered by the Social Security Administration. Depending on office size, SSA employees often work primarily with either SSI or Social Security.

Since the two programs are separate, there are many differences between them with two major ones related to how each is funded and basics of eligibility. U.S. Treasury general revenues fund SSI while Social Security is funded mainly through designated payroll taxes paid by employees and employers. SSI is an assistance program for the aged or disabled with eligibility based on financial need. Social Security provides retirement, survivors and disability benefits based on individual work.

If a person meets the separate program requirements, he or she could receive both Social Security and Supplemental Security. If not, a person might be eligible for just one or neither.

Why is there a SSI program?

The original Social Security Act of 1935 contained more than just the start of Social Security, which is in Title II of the Act. For example, funding for unemployment compensation is in Title III of the Act.   

Other sections of the Act provided federal funding for state run need-based programs of old-age assistance, aid to dependent children and aid to the blind providing the roots for the future SSI program. Despite substantial federal financing, those were essentially state programs. With only broad federal guidelines, each state was responsible for setting its own standards for determining who would receive assistance and how much they would receive. As a result, eligibility requirements and payment levels differed from state to state. Over the years, the State programs became more complex and inconsistent, with as many as 1,350 administrative agencies involved and payments varying more than 300% from State to State. 

Beginning in the early 1960s, this state-operated, federally assisted welfare system drew criticism from within and outside of government for lack of consistency. To reform this, Congress passed and President Richard Nixon approved the Social Security Amendments of 1972, (Public Law 92-603, enacted October 30, 1972), which federalized the programs and created Supplemental Security Income.  

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) provided for a uniform federal income floor of assistance, and optional state programs could supplement that floor. The new program was historic in that it shifted from the states to the federal government the responsibility for determining who would receive assistance and how much assistance they would receive. 

The Social Security Administration was chosen to administer the new SSI program because of its reputation for successful administration of the existing social insurance programs, its existing network of field offices and large-scale data processing and record-keeping operation. At the time, over 3 million people were converted from State welfare programs to SSI. 

The first Supplemental Security Income payments were issued in January 1974. I was there. 

Information for today’s post is primarily from the Social Security website history section and the Background section of the SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013 

Learn more about SSI and Social Security retirement, survivors and disability benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov. Click on the homepage “Benefits” tab to select a topic.

SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013

The SSI Annual Statistical Report, 2013, is now available.

Since 1974, the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program has guaranteed a minimum level of income for needy aged, blind, or disabled individuals. This annual report presents national data on the SSI program and the people who receive benefits from it. The report covers:

  • ·         federal benefit rates, total annual payments, and total recipients;
  • ·         federally administered payments;
  • ·         recipients of Social Security, SSI, or both;
  • ·         children under age 18;
  • ·         noncitizens;
  • ·         diagnoses of recipients under age 65;
  • ·         recipients who work;
  • ·         applications;
  • ·         awards;
  • ·         outcomes of applications for disability benefits; and
  • ·         suspensions, terminations, and duration of eligibility.

From the report Highlights:

Size and Scope of the Supplemental Security Income Program

  • ·         About 8.4 million people received federally administered payments in December 2013.
  • ·         The average monthly payment in December 2013 was $529.
  • ·         Total payments for the year were almost $54 billion, including more than $3 billion in federally administered state supplementation.

Profile of Recipients

  • ·         The majority were female (53 percent).
  • ·         Sixteen percent were under age 18, 59 percent were aged 18 to 64, and 25 percent were aged 65 or older.
  • ·         Most (86 percent) were eligible on the basis of a disability.
  • ·         Six out of 10 recipients under age 65 were diagnosed with a mental disorder.
  • ·         More than half (58 percent) had no income other than their SSI payment.
  • ·         Thirty-three percent of SSI recipients also received Social Security benefits.
  • ·         Of the people receiving SSI benefits, about 2 percent were residing in a Title XIX institution where Medicaid was paying more than half of the cost.
  • ·         Despite their disabilities, about 312,000 recipients (4.3 percent) were working in December 2013.

More about the SSI program is at www.socialsecurity.gov/disabilityssi/ssi.html. To apply, call the national Social Security toll-free number, 1-800-7723-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) from 7:00am – 7:00pm, standard business days, or contact your local office. 

 

 

 

DDS makes disability decisions

Q: Do Social Security employees have medical training so they can evaluate medical information for disability application decisions? 

A: Local Social Security employees do not make medical decisions for disability applications and do not evaluate medical evidence for Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applications. 

Whether a person files online or by personal interview, when a disability application is received, Social Security representatives review it to verify that the non-medical eligibility requirements are met. For example, the SSA employee will verify that an applicant for Social Security disability meets the work requirement or that a person filing for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) meets the income and resource requirements of that need-based program. If these non-medical requirements are not met, they will complete the application to a denial since a medical decision would not be required. 

When non-medical requirements are met, the local office reviews application materials for completeness, including applicant details to describe the disabling impairments, medical treatment, medical releases and related employment and vocational information. 

For the actual medical decision, the disability claim goes to a State agency, usually called a Disability Determination Service (DDS). These state agencies, fully funded by the Federal Government, are responsible for developing medical evidence and making the initial determination on whether or not a claimant is disabled or blind under the law. Samples of DDS decisions from all the States are reviewed within Social Security to maintain national requirements. 

Following a national, step-by-step disability evaluation process, DDS employees make the disability decision and return the application to the local Social Security office for additional work as needed. Depending on the decision, this could be to complete any remaining development before payment begins or, if a denial, holding a file for the appeal period.

SSI Recipients by State and County, 2013

Last week I posted information about the annual publication OASDI Beneficiaries by State and County, 2013, containing Social Security beneficiary information to the individual county level.

Newly released is the publication SSI Recipients By State and County, 2013, containing local area data for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.  

Administered by the Social Security Administration, but very different from Social Security, SSI is a cash assistance program providing monthly benefits to low-income aged, blind, or disabled people, including children.

People can receive both Social Security and SSI if the individual program requirements are met. SSI Recipients By State and County, 2013 shows the number of SSI recipient’s also receiving Social Security (OASDI) benefits.

When looking up your state or county information, note that benefit amounts are shown in thousands of dollars.

For Congressional staff and now You: learn about SSA disability

On May 27, 2014, Congressional staff learned about the Social Security disability program when Carolyn W. Colvin, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, keynoted a Capitol Hill presentation by SSA executives.  

Now you can watch this presentation.

This was a teaching session, not a committee hearing.

Included were details about the growth, solvency and sustainability of the disability program by Stephen C. Goss, Chief Actuary, Social Security Administration.

Other sections were about who receives disability, basic eligibility requirements and the disability process including the initial claim and different levels of appeal.

You can watch the video of this teaching session or just see the slides used.

I urge you to take advantage of this opportunity. Information is easily understandable, without technical jargon. 

After introductions, Stephen Goss’s presentation begins at about 6:45 in the video. Other Social Security executives discussed program information after his portion until about 1:00:00 when audience questions began. The full video is about 1:17:34 in length with several guest introductions and comments included during the session.