When will 1099’s for 2014 be mailed?

The new year always brings questions about taxation of Social Security benefits and receipt of 1099’s.

Earlier this week, I wrote about when people might have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. No one pays federal income tax on more than 85 percent of his or her Social Security benefits based on Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules. 

The SSA-1099 for Tax Year 2014 will be mailed by January 31, 2015.  

Referring to my post of January 5, these are sent to your mailing address as shown on Social Security records so I hope yours is correct. 

You can request a replacement SSA-1099 for Tax Year 2014 on or after February 1, 2015. 

If you need a replacement SSA-1099 for Tax Year 2013 or earlier, see instructions here.

Do I pay income tax on my Social Security benefits?

Q: Do I pay income tax on my Social Security benefits? 

A: Perhaps. Here is information from the Social Security website, www.socialsecurity.gov. Including links to IRS information, more details are at www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/taxes.htm 

Some people have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. This usually happens only if you have other substantial income (such as wages, self-employment, interest, dividends and other taxable income that must be reported on your tax return) in addition to your benefits. 

No one pays federal income tax on more than 85 percent of his or her Social Security benefits based on Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules. 

If you file a federal tax return as an “individual” and your combined income is

·  between $25,000 and $34,000, you may have to pay income tax on up to 50 percent of your benefits.

·  more than $34,000, up to 85 percent of your benefits may be taxable. 

If you file a joint return, and you and your spouse have a combined income that is

·  between $32,000 and $44,000, you may have to pay income tax on up to 50 percent of your benefits

·  more than $44,000, up to 85 percent of your benefits may be taxable. 

If you are married and file a separate tax return, you probably will pay taxes on your benefits.

 

Is payroll tax withheld if I work and receive Social Security?

Q: I stopped working full-time at the end of 2014 and started Social Security retirement. For the next few months I will work part-time and then retire completely.

Will Social Security payroll tax be held from my paycheck? If yes, will this increase my retirement amount? 

A: Yes, you continue to pay Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes. Your employer will continue doing so too. Everyone working in employment or self-employment covered by Social Security must pay payroll taxes regardless of age or eligibility to Social Security benefits. Current and historical Social Security and Medicare tax rates are shown here. 

If you are younger than full retirement age, remember annual earnings test limits.

Your new earnings would have to be better than the ones already used to compute your retirement amount to increase your monthly retirement amount. While possible, it is doubtful that a few months of part-time work will change your monthly retirement amount since the best 35 years of your working career are used.  

Benefit amounts of everyone receiving Social Security benefits are automatically reviewed when new earnings are posted to their work record even when low earnings are involved. Due to this, your retirement amount will be automatically reviewed once these 2015 earnings appear on your work record. 

Since you worked full-time all of 2014, it is much more likely that your 2014 earnings will increase your retirement amount when automatically reviewed. 

Employers report your earnings to the Social Security Administration as part of the W-2 process. Different employer deadlines apply based on how reporting is completed. Employers have a March 31 deadline if electronically reporting 2014 W-2 information using Social Security Business Services Online (BSO). If reporting by paper, the deadline is the last day of February.

However reported, national posting of all wage information is usually complete in approximately October, with automatic reviews of benefit amounts starting once wage posting is complete. If 2014 earnings increase retirement benefits, you will receive the increase in approximately December 2015, with payment retroactive to January 2015. 

 

Receiving Social Security? Have you moved?

When benefit amounts change for a person receiving either Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a letter is sent by regular Post Office mail telling the new amount and reasons for the change. 

As routinely done, recently the Social Security Administration has been mailing letters to beneficiaries explaining the 2015 cost-of-living increase benefit changes. Many of those letters cannot be delivered because Social Security records had an old address and Post Office mail forwarding requests were either not done or had expired.

One result is that the people involved do not receive important benefit information sent to them unless they contact Social Security to ask about it. These recontacts create more work for both the person and Social Security representatives. 

Have you moved this year while receiving either Social Security or SSI benefits? Did you report your new mailing address so that your records stay accurate? If not, do this now. 

Update your address in several ways.  

Online: Social Security beneficiaries can update their address online at any convenient time if they have a personal my Social Security account. SSI recipients cannot update their address this way but other my Social Security services such as getting an online letter to prove your benefit amount remain available. For your convenience, this is the suggested method. Create your my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/.

By phone: you can telephone the Social Security national toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 / TTY 1-800-325-0778, from 7:00am – 7:00pm local time. National numbers are answered at different sites across the country. Representatives there can help you with other Social Security business as well.  

In person: You can phone or visit your local Social Security office. Local office hours vary but most have public hours of 9:00am – 3:00pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday and 9:00am – noon on Wednesday. Learn local office hours and locations here, in the “Find an Office” section. 

Even when your benefit payment continues going to the same bank, credit union or other financial institution, be sure to notify Social Security of mailing address changes. This helps you. It helps Social Security. 

By whatever method you choose, keep your mailing address current when you receive Social Security or SSI benefits. Important information is mailed to you during the year. Make sure you receive the news.

Did Social Security always have a COLA?

With the 1.7 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2015 about to begin, it is worth noting that many pensions do not have a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) provision. Unlike the inflation protection provided by Social Security retirement, survivors and disability benefits, for pensions lacking a COLA your starting amount is your final amount, even if you receive the pension for many years. 

One of the many valuable aspects of Social Security benefits, the annual, automatic review of Social Security amounts for a possible cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) is now such an accepted feature of the program that it is difficult to imagine a time when there were no COLAs. However, such a time existed. Social Security beneficiaries did not originally receive cost-of-living adjustments.  

Although the first SSA benefit was paid in January 1940, the first cost-of-living adjustment related increase was not until 1950 followed by a second in 1952. Part of the 1950 Amendments, the first Social Security COLA was signed into law by President Truman. Neither of these two increases was automatic. Both times, Congress enacted special legislation for the purpose.  

Automatic Social Security COLAs began in 1975, based on 1972 legislation. Signed into law by President Nixon, this legislation established automatic COLAs based on the annual increase in the consumer price index, if any. 

Since then the automatic cost-of-living adjustment has increased Social Security benefits in almost all years. Learn COLA percentages for 1975-2014 at www.socialsecurity.gov/cola/automatic-cola.htm 

The 1.7 percent cost-of-living adjustment for 2015 begins with benefits that more than 58 million Social Security beneficiaries receive in January 2015. Increased payments to more than 8 million Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries will begin on December 31, 2014.

Details about the 2015 COLA are here.

More than monthly payment amounts change due to a COLA. Other related changes are here.

 

 

 

Does Social Security contact you at 62?

Q: Does Social Security automatically contact you about starting retirement benefits when you are near age 62? 

A: Social Security does not do this but the agency does provide estimates and planning information for people thinking about starting retirement benefits, whether at age 62 or other ages.  

Concerning when to start Social Security retirement, lots of planning information is on the Social Security website, www.socialsecurity.gov, in the Retirement Benefits section and especially in the Retirement Planner at www.socialsecurity.gov/retire2/ 

Different calculators are there. In combination with the Retirement Estimator, the compute the effect of early or delayed retirement calculator is excellent for comparing different start month amounts, both before and after full retirement age.  

You can also create a personal my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/ to check your earnings record as recorded on Social Security records and for retirement and family benefit estimates.

In addition to online services, you can contact Social Security representatives by calling the national toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), from 7:00am – 7:00pm, or your local office.

 

Reminder about 2015 Social Security & SSI payment dates

I posted the 2015 schedule of payment dates for Social Security and Supplemental Security income in September. As 2015 gets closer, I am getting many requests for the schedule so here it is again. The link is http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10031-2015.pdf.

A link to the 2015 payment calendar is on my Areavoices homepage blogroll. 

With several exceptions, since 1997 Social Security payment dates are based on the number holder’s (NH) date of birth. You are the NH if receiving Social Security on your own work record. If receiving based on the work of someone else, that person is the NH.    

Therefore, if you receive Social Security retirement or disability through your own work, the payment date is based on your birth date. A child or spouse receiving benefits on your record will also have a payment date based on your birth date. 

 A couple can receive Social Security payment on different days if each person is receiving his or her own retirement benefit.   

Social Security benefits are generally paid on the second Wednesday if the number holder was born within the first 10 days of a month, the third Wednesday if born within the 11-20th days and on the fourth Wednesday if born within the 21-31st days.  

Not all Social Security payment dates are birth date based. If you received Social Security before May 1997, your payment date remained the third of the month. People eligible for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) generally receive SSI on the first and their Social Security on the third of the month.  

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) funds are usually paid on the first of a month. 

Regular payment dates for both Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are advanced if the usual date falls on a day when financial institutions such as banks or credit unions are closed so, for example, SSI payments for January 2015 will arrive on December 31, rather than on January 1. 

One more item about payments: routine Social Security retirement, disability and survivors benefits are paid in the following month, meaning benefits for January arrive in February. Routine Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are for the month paid so SSI arriving in February is for February.

 

 

 

 

 

What is the maximum 2015 Social Security retirement amount?

For the last several years, I have published the maximum monthly Social Security retirement amount payable during the coming year. This generates a lot of interest so today I am providing the 2015 amount.  

To be clear, this will be the maximum amount payable to a person retiring exactly at full retirement age (FRA) in 2015. Full retirement age is 66 for people born in 1943 – 1954. It does not include reductions for early retirement or increases for delaying retirement past past full retirement age. Learn about these increases, called delayed retirement credits, here. 

The maximum monthly Social Security retirement amount changes each year. The 2015 maximum is more than the 2014 maximum, but will be less than the 2016 amount. Several reasons are responsible for this with a major one being that another year of potentially higher earnings becomes available for use in computing retirement amounts. Not only might actual earnings be higher but, depending on the maximum taxable earnings base for that year, more of the earnings could be credited for use in the Social Security computation.

An early step in determining a retirement amount is to compute the person’s amount at full retirement age, without reductions or increases. To do this, Social Security uses the person’s best 35 years of earnings, weighted for inflation. Then, to compute the amount for the person’s actual retirement date, Social Security adjusts the full retirement age amount by the number of months that the person is away from FRA. The FRA amount is reduced or increased if the person is younger or older than FRA. 

So, what is the maximum 2015 Social Security retirement amount? If starting Social Security retirement in 2015 exactly when full retirement age is reached, and if the person earned at least the maximum SSA taxable earnings (the taxable base) in each of the 35 years used in the calculation, then the highest 2015 Social Security retirement amount is $2,663 per month. For comparison, the highest 2014 Social Security retirement amount is $2,642 per month. The estimated average SSA retirement amount as of January 2015 is $1,328 per month.

Knowing the highest 2015 Social Security retirement amount is interesting. Estimating your own retirement amount is more useful. Do so with the calculators included in the SSA Retirement Planner 

The Retirement Estimator is very good because it uses your actual Social Security earnings record. Automatic estimates are shown for age 62, your full retirement age, and age 70. You can adjust these for different ages or different future earnings.  

To adjust your estimate by the number of months that you are away from FRA use the “Compute the effect of early or delayed retirement” calculator. There, primary insurance amount is the same as amount at full retirement age, and normal retirement age is the same as FRA.   

Want to see the earnings on your Social Security record? Create a personal my Social Security account and view your online Social Security Statement. The Statement provides your earnings record, plus family estimates for SSA retirement, survivors and disability benefits. 

Ready to file for your Social Security retirement? Go online.

 

2015 SSA taxes and taxable earnings base

Q: How much does a person have to earn in 2015 before withholding for Social Security taxes end? 

A: In 2015, the maximum amount of earnings subject to Social Security tax is $118,500. In 2014, this amount was $117,000. People earning above the annual maximum taxable level stop paying SSA payroll tax once that amount is reached.   

Of the estimated 168 million workers who will pay Social Security taxes in 2015, about 10 million will pay higher taxes because of the increase in the taxable maximum. Medicare payroll tax continues on all earnings.  

The taxable earnings level can change annually based on changes in the national average wage index. To reflect the general rise in the standard of living over a working lifetime, changes to this average wage index are used when future SSA benefits are computed.   

From 1937 to 2015, changes to the amount of earnings subject to Social Security earnings tax are here. 

The 2015 Social Security tax is set by statute at 6.2 percent for employees and employers, each. An individual with wages equal to or larger than $118,500 will pay $7,347.00 towards the SSA retirement, survivors and disability programs in 2015, and his or her employer would contribute the same amount. The tax rate for self-employment income in 2015 is 12.4 percent. 

People earning less than the 2014 maximum tax base will not pay more in 2015 because SSA and Medicare tax rates are not changing. They have not changed since 1990. 

The Medicare tax rate is an additional 1.45 percent on all earnings so the total employee and employer tax rate is 7.65 percent. For the self-employed, it is 15.30 percent. 

Historical Social Security and Medicare tax rates are here.

Social Security benefits and citizenship

Q: I am a legal resident alien, working full-time and paying Social Security taxes on my earnings. Will I be able to receive Social Security benefits at retirement? 

A: Yes, assuming you work long enough and meet all usual requirements. United States citizenship is not required to receive Social Security benefits. Your future retirement, or payment of any Social Security benefits through your work record, will be based largely on your work history, not citizenship. You will need to prove legal admittance into the country when applying for benefits. 

Visitors to the United States can usually obtain a Social Security number (SSN) only if authorized to work by the Department of Homeland Security. Work authorization is routinely verified when a person applies for an original, name change correction or replacement card.  

If you become a citizen in the future, contact Social Security to update your citizenship on your Social Security number record. This will make a future application for retirement benefits easier, especially if you use the online application because, since your record would show United States citizenship, legal admittance would not have to be established.  

Learn the documents needed and print the Social Security number application at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber/. Documents submitted must be originals certified by the issuing agency, such as Homeland Security, and are immediately returned. Self-made photocopies or notarized copies are not accepted.

To protect your personal information, SSN applications cannot be submitted electronically. No fees are involved for any SSN action. Protect yourself by going to the official Social Security website, www.socialsecurity.gov for SSN information.