Approaching Age 65? Remember Medicare.

Approaching age 65? Remember Medicare. Medicare begins for most people at age 65, earlier if receiving disability. If you receive Social Security benefits, expect a Medicare card and instructions several months in advance of age 65 from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Part of the Department of Health and Human Services, CMS is…
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Medicare Legislation Anniversary

Tomorrow is the 51st anniversary of Medicare legislation.   On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law to provide health insurance for the elderly.  The Medicare legislation was signed in Independence, Missouri, in the presence of Harry S. Truman who opened the fight for such legislation in a message to Congress in…
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Is Age 65 Still Important For Social Security Retirement?

Q: Is age 65 still important for Social Security retirement? A: While age 65 is important as the starting age for Medicare, it has no special meaning for Social Security retirement anymore. Until the Social Security Amendments of 1983, retirement benefits were not reduced for age if you waited until age 65 before starting them.…
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Medicare And Pre-existing Health Problems

Q: Will existing health problems prevent me from getting Medicare coverage? A: Existing health problems will not prevent your enrollment in Medicare. Many people think of Medicare as beginning only at age 65 but that is not the full story. People younger than age 65 and receiving Social Security benefits based on their own disability…
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Medicare General Enrollment Period (GEP)

Most people enroll for Medicare Part B (Medical) at age 65 or defer enrollment without future penalty because they have medical coverage through their own current employment or the current employment of a spouse. There is a special Part B enrollment period without penalty or increased premium for these people. Today’s post does not concern…
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