Boomers, Social Security and Someday

Are you a Baby Boomer?

Boomers have been filing for Social Security retirement for several years already.

On October 15, 2007, at an event hosted by Michael J. Astrue, then the Commissioner of Social Security, the nation’s first Baby Boomer, Kathleen Casey-Kirschling, filed for her Social Security retirement benefits online at 

Ms. Casey-Kirschling, who was born one second after midnight on January 1, 1946, was eligible for benefits beginning January 2008 and graciously helped promote filing for Social Security retirement online. 

Here is a photo of Ms. Casey-Kirschling from that 2007 event:

Today, nationally over 50 percent of all Social Security retirement  applications are filed online. Learn how here.

Over the next 20 years, nearly 80 million Boomers will retire.

Someday, do you plan to retire? Boomer or not, Social Security should be part of your planning.

Lots of SSA retirement planning information is on the Social Security website,, in the Retirement Benefits section and especially in the Retirement Planner area. Different calculators to help your planning are there including the Retirement Estimator, that connects to your own work record to provide an individual estimate.

Someday is closer than you think. Create your personal my Social Security account for additional estimates and to check your earnings record for accuracy.

Disability videos on YouTube

When discussing a Social Security retirement topic, I often mention that retirement information and calculators based on your personal work record are in the Retirement Planner section of the Social Security website,

The potential for becoming disabled is probably a smaller topic of interest, but just over 1 in 4 of today’s 20 year-olds will become disabled before reaching age 67. I think acknowledging this possibility should be part of routine financial planning, especially if you have a dependent family.   

You cannot estimate the amount of potential Social Security disability benefits online but can obtain an estimate on your Social Security Statement. That estimate assumes you become disabled now, a good starting point for your financial planning. Your Statement is available online once you register for your free, personal my Social Security account.  

What if you became disabled now due to accident or illness? What do you need to know? How do you file for Social Security disability and how is an application processed? 

Use the Disability Planner section of the website to learn basic information about Social Security disability. There you can file a complete disability application online, and if needed, appeal a decision that you disagree with. 

Especially read the section about how you qualify for disability benefits. Linked from the Disability Planner, you can also watch a Social Security Disability Claims Process video series on YouTube. More questions? Contact Social Security directly.

Agency Resumes Mailing Social Security Statements

Tuesday, September 16, 2014 

News Release


Agency Resumes Mailing Social Security Statements

Encourages People to Create a Secure my Social Security Account to Obtain Their Statement Online, Anytime

Carolyn W. Colvin, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, today announced the agency will resume the periodic mailing of Social Security Statements–once every five years for most workers–while encouraging everyone to create a secure my Social Security account to immediately access their Statement online, anytime. The Statement is a valuable financial planning tool providing workers age 18 and older with important individualized information regarding their earnings, tax contributions, and estimates for future retirement, disability, and survivors benefits.

“We have listened to our customers, advocates, and Congress; and renewing the mailing of the Statement reinforces our commitment to provide the public with an easy, efficient way to obtain an estimate of their future Social Security benefits,” Acting Commissioner Colvin said. “I encourage everyone to create their own secure my Social Security  account to obtain immediate access to their Statement online, anytime.” 

Beginning this month, workers attaining ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 who are not receiving Social Security benefits and who are not registered for a my Social Security account will receive the Statement in the mail about 3 months before their birthday.  After age 60, people will receive a Statement every year.  The agency expects to send nearly 48 million Statements each year.

The Social Security Statement helps people plan for their financial future.  In addition to providing future benefit estimates, the Statement highlights a person’s complete earnings history, allowing workers to verify the accuracy of their earnings. This is important because an individual’s future benefit amount is determined by the amount of their earnings over their lifetime.  To date, more than 14 million people have established a personalized my Social Security account at

With a my Social Securityaccount, people may access the Statement from the comfort of their home, office or library whenever they choose. Individuals who currently receive benefits should sign up for a my Social Security account to manage their benefit payments and, when the need arises, get an instant benefit verification letter, change their address and phone number, and start or change direct deposit of their benefit payment.

Acting Commissioner Colvin reinforced that “whether conducting business with Social Security via the Internet, mail, telephone or face-to-face, we will continue to provide convenient, cost-effective, secure and quality customer service to meet the needs of the public we serve.” 


You can see a sample Social Security Statement here.



Social Security Twitter Chat today at 1:30 p.m. EDT

As part of National my Social SecurityWeek, the Social Security Administration is hosting its first Twitter Chat, titled #mySocialSecurity: Planning for Your Financial Future today August 21, 2014 from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. EDT

Joining will be the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Federal Trade Commission.

During the Twitter Chat, you can ask questions relating to the topic using the hashtag #mySocialSecurity.

This week the Social Security Administration hopes to educate the public about the benefits of having a my Social Security account.

Individuals can use their my Social Security accounts to access their Social Security Statements to check their earnings and get estimates of future Social Security benefits.

People already receiving Social Security benefits can get benefit verification letters, change their address and phone number, and start or change their direct deposit information.

Participate in the my Social Security Twitter Chat today, Thursday August 21, 2014, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. EDT.

Visit and create your my Social Security account today.

National my Social Security Week

If you receive Social Security benefits or have Medicare, you can use a mySocial Security online account to:

1. Get your benefit verification letter;

2. Check your benefit and payment information and your earnings record;

3. Change your address and phone number; and

4.Start or change direct deposit of your benefit payment.

 If you do not receive benefits, you can use a mySocial Security online account to:

A) Get yourSocial Security Statement to review:

          1) Estimates of your future retirement, disability, and survivors benefits;

          2) Your earnings once a year to verify the amounts we posted are correct and see the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid.

B) Get a benefit verification letter stating that:

          1) You never received Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicare; or

          2) You received benefits in the past, but do not currently receive them or

          3) You applied for benefits but haven’t received an answer yet.

Get your free personal online my Social Security account today!


Planning for Someday with the SSA retirement planner

Planning for retirement, including learning the basics of Social Security, should begin well before you actually retire.  

Based on the questions I receive, advance planning is not always done. 

Lots of SSA retirement planning information is on the Social Security website,, in the Retirement Benefits section and especially in the Retirement Planner area at  

 Here is a partial list of Retirement Planner topics:

     Finding your retirement age (full retirement age – FRA)

     Estimating your retirement benefits and other calculators

     Working after retirement

     Discover your retirement options

     Benefits for family members

     Needed documents

     Online retirement application

     Applying just for Medicare

 Someday you will want to retire. Start planning today to make someday possible.

What is your Someday?

The newest Social Security Update became available today and includes a section, partially reprinted here, about a time that everyone seems to look forward to – Someday – and how you can help plan for yours.

From the Update newsletter: 

For many people, Someday is an elusive day on the far-off horizon—always seeming close enough to see, but too distant to touch. Perhaps Someday you plan to go skydiving. Or enter a hot dog-eating contest. Maybe Someday you plan to ride a mechanical bull. Or travel around the world. Or visit all of America’s national parks.

Someday, you will want to retire. If you are mid-career, Someday, you will need to start planning for retirement. Even if you are just now starting your career, Someday you’re going to want to see what your future Social Security benefits will be and check your earnings for accuracy. Someday has arrived. Open a my Social Security account at, and you’ll see what we mean. 

Millions of people have opened a my Social Security account, and our Someday campaign will help millions more learn about my Social Security and sign up for their free online account. Someone opens a new account just about every six seconds. 

Watch our new Public Service Announcement at


You can estimate your reduced retirement amount

It has been many years since age 65 was routinely full retirement age (FRA). Except for people born in 1937 or earlier, FRA is an older age, resulting in a reduced retirement amount for benefits started at age 65. The legislative change to FRA was included in the Social Security Amendments of 1983, signed into law by President Reagan. 

Despite this change taking place years ago, I routinely receive questions from people who do not seem to be aware of it. Very recently, several questions arrived from a person reaching age 65 in March of 2015, when he planned to retire. He wanted to start his Social Security retirement at that time but was concerned about avoiding a reduced retirement amount. 

As noted above, since he will be age 65 in 2015, starting his SSA retirement that March results in a reduced benefit because he will still be younger that his full retirement age (FRA) of 66. The way to avoid a reduced Social Security retirement benefit is by waiting to start until FRA. 

Once at least age 62, you can start your SSA retirement with any month you chose. Any reduction or increase depends on the number of months that you are before or past your full retirement age (FRA). Reductions are permanent but any cost of living adjustments are received. 

Information and calculators are at the SSA Retirement Planner. Use the Retirement Estimator to obtain your approximate full retirement age (FRA) amount based on your own work record.

In the Retirement Planner, use the “Find your retirement age” chart to find your own full retirement age (FRA). More than just providing a FRA, this chart also shows the month-by-month percentage of reduction from age 62 to FRA. Each full retirement age has slightly different reduction percentages because the number of months from age 62 to the FRA will be different from the other FRA’s.

Full retirement age is 66 for people born between1943-1954. For them, starting SSA retirement before age 66 means a reduced amount, with different reductions for each month. Below are two images from the FRA page for these years of birth. The first shows what the FRA is and the second is an example of the monthly reduction rates for FRA at age 66. Neither is a full image.

Using these charts to estimate the retirement amount for any month is easy. For example, use a birthdate of March 7, 1950, and an FRA amount of $1,500. Starting SSA retirement effective March 2016 at age 66 provides an unreduced $1,500 monthly amount. Using this, here are results of several 2015 retirement months.

Depending on expected 2015 earnings and the 2015 SSA retirement earnings limits, which are not yet known, this person might decide to start Social Security retirement effective with January 2015, even with an actual retirement date in March. That is 14 months early, providing a monthly benefit reduced to about 92.2 percent of the FRA amount, or about $1,383.  

Benefits started effective March 2015, are 12 months early. Starting then results in a monthly retirement about 93.3 percent of the FRA, equal to about $1,399 per month,  while benefits started with April are 11 months early and reduced to about 93.9 percent or $1,408. Start benefits when best for you, whether before, at or after FRA.  

Also part of the Retirement Planner, the “Compute the effect of early or delayed retirement” calculator provides the same basic reduced benefit information while also including benefit amount increases information for retirement started when you are older than full retirement age. Early or delayed refers to before or after your full retirement age. This calculator uses the term “primary insurance amount” which means the same thing as your full retirement age (FRA) amount. As above, use the Retirement Estimator to estimate your personal FRA amount based on your own work record.







Survivor benefits if twice widowed

This interesting question came from a woman so, for convenience, the answer refers to Social Security survivors benefits for a widow. The information also applies to a widower.

Q: I did not work outside the home, but have been widowed twice. I started Social Security widows benefit at age 60 after my first husband died. Eventually I remarried, continuing those benefits, until now at age 65 was widowed for a second time. The SSA representative said I could receive a larger benefit amount from my second husband now or wait for an even higher amount at age 66. Please explain this.

A: It was excellent that this person contacted Social Security to learn about possible benefits. Social Security representatives can provide options to consider based on personal information you provide, but the decision is yours. Ask questions until you understand your options.

A person can be eligible for benefits on more than one Social Security work record. For this question, survivors benefits are possible through the work records of two deceased husbands. More routine examples are people who are eligible for retirement through their own work record and that of a spouse or through their own retirement and a suvivors record as widow or widower. When eligible on more than one record, combined benefit amounts will equal the highest individual benefit amount.

Age 60 is the earliest a widow or widower can start Social Security survivors benefits based on age. The younger you start, the larger the reduction. As with SSA retirement benefits, each month of delay in starting provides a larger monthly amount, but only up to when you reach your survivors full retirement age (FRA). Survivors FRA’s are different from retirement FRA’s.

For example, when started at age 60 the monthly reduction in survivors benefits is about 28.5 percent so this woman receives about 71.5 percent of the maximum survivors benefit amount on her first husband’s record.

Since she remarried after age 60, SSA survivors benefits through her first husband continued. These benefits cannot be paid if a person remarries before age 60, unless that marriage ends. Although possible, for simplicity it is being assumed that she did not receive SSA benefits as a spouse through her second husband’s work record.

Based on the question, she is younger than her full retirement age (FRA) for survivors benefits and SSA benefits from her second husband’s work record will be higher than those already being received.

Effective with the month of the second husband’s death, one option she has is to begin widow’s benefits through his work record immediately. These would be reduced for age. If exactly age 65, she would receive about 95.3 percent of the full amount.

Another option is that she could continue receiving only the widows benefit through her first husbands record and delay starting benefits through the second husband until she was older. That benefit amount would increase with each month of delay up to FRA when she would receive 100 percent of the amount payable through his record.

People of all ages receive monthly Social Security survivors benefits. Learn more at

Social Security at age 62

Every so often, I have mentioned that Social Security legislation is now gender neutral, meaning that benefit requirements are the same for women and men. This has not always been the case.

Today, June 30, is the anniversary of legislation that helped provide men with the same retirement benefits already enjoyed by women. Although few are probably aware of it now, this legislation was important to any man starting Social Security retirement benefits before reaching full retirement age (FRA).

Today’s concept of full retirement age was not required when Social Security first began because the Social Security Act of 1935 did not contain provisions for retirement payments before age 65. 

Concerning age for retirement, the 1935 Act, section Title II-Federal Old-Age Benefits, states:

“SEC. 202. (a) Every qualified individual (as defined in section 210) shall be entitled to receive, with respect to the period beginning on the date he attains the age of sixty-five, or on January 1, 1942, whichever is the later …”

For men, this changed on June 30, 1961 when the Social Security Amendments of 1961 were signed by President John F. Kennedy. Along with other provisions, these Amendments permitted male workers to elect early retirement at age 62.

When were women able to start Social Security retirement at age 62? November 1956, when Dwight D. Eisenhower was President.

When to start your Social Security retirement is an individual decision but starting before reaching full retirement age remains very popular. Use the free, personalized, online planning tools and calculators in the SSA Retirement Planner to help plan your SSA retirement. For some topics to consider, read the SSA publication “When to Start Receiving Retirement Benefits.”