Popular baby names of 2014 by state

Following up my earlier post about the popular baby names of 2014, the Social Security Administration has provided the most popular 2013 baby names by individual state.  You can look up the top 100 names for your state here.

In addition to each state’s top baby names, Social Security’s website has a list of the 1,000 most popular boys’ and girls’ names for 2014 and offers lists of baby names for each year since 1880.

Different spellings of similar names are not combined. For example, the names Caitlin, Caitlyn, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelyn, and Katelynn are considered separate names and each has its own rank.

The birth of a child is a special time for families. While having fun with the baby names list, Social Security Acting Commissioner Colvin encourages everyone to visit the agency’s website and create a my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov.

For estimates and to see your work record, my Social Security is a personalized online account that you can use beginning in your working years and continuing throughout the time your receive Social Security benefits.

Nationally for 2014, the 10 most popular male and female names are:

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For states in my immediate area, here are the top 10 male and female baby names of 2014. See the complete list of 100 names for each state here.

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babynames2014-MN

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Popular Baby Names for 2014 & more

Here is the Social Security press release announcing the most popular baby names of 2014 along with other information.

Noah and Emma Top Social Security’s List of Most Popular Baby Names for 2014

Agency Adds to Its Family with New Blog

 

Emma and Noah are America’s most popular baby names for 2014. Emma returns to the top spot she held in 2008 and hangs out in first place with Noah. There are a few new names in the top 10 this year—James (a former #1 from the ‘40s and ‘50s) on the blue side and Charlotte on the pink side, her first time ever in the top 10. Makes you wonder if the Duke & Duchess of Cambridge got a sneak peak at the list, since naming their baby girl Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte (which lands at #10) Elizabeth (which fell from the top 10 to #14) Diana (#297) of Cambridge. Social Security has a new addition this year too, Social Security Matters, the agency’s newborn interactive blog located at http://blog.socialsecurity.gov.

Here are the top 10 boys and girls names for 2014:

Boys: 1.) Noah Girls: 1.) Emma
2.) Liam 2.) Olivia
3.) Mason 3.) Sophia
4.) Jacob 4.) Isabella
5.) William 5.) Ava
6.) Ethan 6.) Mia
7.) Michael 7.) Emily
8.) Alexander 8.) Abigail
9.) James 9.) Madison
10.) Daniel 10.) Charlotte

For all the top baby names of 2014, go to Social Security’s website, www.socialsecurity.gov/oact/babynames/.

Social Security Matters, the agency’s new bundle of joy, launches as we celebrate 80 years of serving the American public, and is an addition to our communications family where people can find information on retirement, disability, Supplemental Security Income, online services, and much more. It also is a place where the public can engage in conversations with the agency about what matters most. The blog encourages discussion and offers important solutions. Much like being a new parent, making benefit decisions can be overwhelming. The blog is the latest in a long line of tools Social Security offers to help educate the public about their benefits and how to access agency services.

The birth of a child is a special time for families. While having fun with the baby names list, Acting Commissioner Carolyn W. Colvin encourages everyone to visit the agency’s website and create a my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/.

my Social Security is a personalized online account that people can use beginning in their working years and continuing throughout the time they receive Social Security benefits. Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries can have instant access to their benefit verification letter, payment history, and complete earnings record by establishing a my Social Security account. Beneficiaries also can change their address, start or change direct deposit information, and print a replacement SSA-1099 online.

Individuals age 18 and older who are not receiving benefits can also sign up for a my Social Security account to get their personalized online Social Security Statement. The online Statement provides workers with secure and convenient access to their Social Security earnings and benefit information, and estimates of future benefits they can use to plan for their retirement.

The agency began compiling the baby name list in 1997, with names dating to back to 1880. At the time of a child’s birth, parents supply the name to the agency when applying for a child’s Social Security card, thus making Social Security America’s source for the most popular baby names.

Each year, the list reveals the effect of pop-culture on naming trends. This year’s winners for biggest jump in popularity in the Top 1,000 are Aranza and Bode.

Aranza jumped an amazing 3,625 spots on the girls’ side to number 607, from number 4,232 in 2013. The Latin soap opera “Por siempre mi amor” was aired on Univision from 2013 to 2015. The show featured a young lead character named Aranza, and obviously had its effect on naming trends last year.

Bode raced ahead 645 spots, from number 1,428 in 2013 to number 783 in 2014. This might have had something to do with the Winter Olympics in early 2014, where Bode Miller continued his outstanding alpine skiing career by collecting his sixth Olympic medal. Not only is he the most successful male American alpine skier of all time, he is considered by many to be an American hero.

The second fastest riser for boys was Axl, a nod to both rock legend Axl Rose of Guns N’ Roses and Axl Jack Duhamel, son of Stacy Ann “Fergie” Ferguson and Josh Duhamel. For girls, Montserrat, the lead character in a very popular Latin soap opera, was number two, joined by another Monserrat (spelled just one letter differently) at number three.

Popular baby names by state will be available at www.socialsecurity.gov/oact/babynames/ on May 14.

 

Baby names & SSN’s for newborns

A New Year is usually depicted as a baby. That, and local recognition of the first baby of the year, brought me to today’s topic of baby names.

Perhaps you will be helping to name a baby soon, perhaps not. Either way, annually near Mother’s Day, the Social Security Administration provides the most popular baby names of the previous year based on applications for new Social Security number (SSN) cards. The agency began compiling the baby name list in 1997, with names dating to back to 1880. 

Parents usually apply for the child’s SSN at the time of birth, thus making Social Security America’s source for the most popular baby names.   

How popular is your name? Popular baby names for 2013 and other years are on the Social Security website at www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/. There you can learn popular baby names for the nation, by state, and see changes in popularity of a given name over many years. Other information for new parents is there too.

Nationally for 2013, the five most popular male names were Noah, Liam, Jacob, Mason and William. The five most popular female names were Sophia, Emma, Olivia, Isabella and Ava.  

Different spellings of similar names are not combined when compiling the popular name lists. For example, the names Caitlin, Caitlyn, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelyn, and Katelynn are considered separate names and each has its own rank.

New parents are encouraged to request a Social Security number (SSN) for their newborn through the hospital as part of the birth registration process. 

Very popular, this free and voluntary process, called Enumeration at Birth, allows the state agency that issues birth certificates to send the child’s birth registration information directly to the Social Security Administration. Without any additional paperwork, a SSN is issued to the child and the card mailed to the parents.  

If not using Enumeration at Birth, parents must first wait for the newborn’s official birth certificate to be issued before requesting a Social Security number for him or her. Then they must complete a SSN application and show the child’s birth certificate plus their own ID documents to Social Security. It is much easier and faster to do this as part of your child’s birth registration. Learn more at www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10023.pdf.

 

By individual state: popular baby names of 2013

Following up my earlier post about the popular baby names of 2013, earlier today the Social Security Administration announced the most popular 2013 baby names by individual state. You can look up the top 100 names for your state here. 

Different spellings of similar names are not combined. For example, the names Caitlin, Caitlyn, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelyn, and Katelynn are considered separate names and each has its own rank.

Following are the top 10 male and female baby names of 2013 for states in my immediate area:  

Popular baby names of 2013

As annually done near Mother’s Day, last Friday the Social Security Administration provided the most popular baby names of the previous year based on applications for new Social Security number (SSN) cards. The agency began compiling the baby name list in 1997, with names dating to back to 1880.

Parents usually apply for the child’s SSN at the time of birth, thus making Social Security America’s source for the most popular baby names.

Popular baby names for 2013 are on the SSA website at www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/.  There you can learn popular baby names for the nation, by state, and see changes in popularity of a given name over many years. How popular is your name?

Nationally for 2013, the five most popular male names are Noah, Liam, Jacob, Mason and William. The five most popular female names are Sophia, Emma, Olivia, Isabella and Ava.

First time atop the list is Noah, the first new boys name at number one since 1960 other than Jacob or Michael, and the third straight year for Sophia. 

Different spellings of similar names are not combined. For example, the names Caitlin, Caitlyn, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelyn, and Katelynn are considered separate names and each has its own rank.

Popular 2013 names by individual state will be available on May 15. Popular names by state for prior years are available now.

Baby names & getting a SSN for your newborn

Every year near Mother’s Day, the Social Security Administration posts popular baby names for the prior year based on Social Security number (SSN) card applications.

If you are expecting a New Year’s baby in the family and still need a name, for ideas go to the SSA list of top baby names for 2012. The Items of Interest section at bottom left of the SSA homepage, www.socialsecurity.gov, has a direct link to the baby name page. Along with Social Security information about children, the baby names section links to other items of interest to parents. 

When compiling the annual list, different spellings of similar names are not combined. For example, the names Caitlin, Caitlyn, Kaitlin, Kaitlyn, Kaitlynn, Katelyn, and Katelynn are considered separate names and each has its own rank.

You can look up the popularity of a name nationally, by individual state or by year of birth and can even see how the popularity of a name has changed over time.

The easiest, recommended and very popular way to get your new baby a Social Security number is through the hospital when you apply for his or her birth certificate. This free and voluntary option, called Enumeration at Birth, lets the state agency that issues birth certificates share your child’s information with the Social Security Administration. Then, without additional paperwork or action from you, a Social Security number card is issued for your child and mailed to you based on the birth certificate information. This convenient method is faster and easier than waiting to apply directly with Social Security. See Social Security Numbers for Children, publication 05-10023, for more information.

Applying for your newborn’s Social Security number (SSN) at the hospital as part of his or her birth registration is definitely the recommended method. However, if you decide not to use Enumeration at Birth, a paper SSN application will need to be submitted to Social Security, in-person or by mail, with a certified, official copy of his or her birth certificate plus proof of your identity. Also free, the application and evidence details are at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.

Warning: if not using Enumeration at Birth through the hospital, make sure you are at the genuine Social Security website and not at a private, for profit site. There is no charge for any Social Security number action. To protect your newborn’s personal ID information, at the genuine www.socialsecurity.gov website you do not enter information online. Instead, you print the application for offline completion. 

SSN changes for an adopted child

Q: Our newly adopted baby son already has a Social Security number (SSN). Can we change his SSN to correct his name and show us as his parents?

A: Yes, at no charge. Learn the documents needed and print the downloadable application at http://socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber/.  An easy to follow decision path will show you what documents are needed. Usually you can bring or mail the application with all needed documents to your local office for processing. Once processed, the updated SSN card is mailed to your address.

As a general guideline for any SSN name change, child or adult, documents seen must clearly show the person going from the previous to new name. For example, adoption decrees or marriage certificates often show both the previous and new name. In your case, you must also show the change in parent names. Documents Social Security may accept to prove your child’s legal name and parent changes include the final adoption decree, court order for a name change or amended birth certificate. Separate ID for your son might be needed. Proof of your relationship to your son and ID for you is needed. This might be your driver’s license or U.S. passport. 

Sometimes one document multiple purposes. All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency, not photocopies you made or notarized copies of documents. All documents are returned to you. Once corrected, your child will have the same SSN as before.

 All SSN actions are provided free by Social Security. Protect yourself.  Be sure to access information through the Social Security website at www.socialsecurity.gov. From the homepage, SSN information is in the Numbers & Cards tab.

Popular baby names for each state available

Did you check to see how popular your name is?

Last week the Social Security Administration announced the most popular baby names nationally for 2012. For years after 1879 you can learn the national popularity of a given name by percentage of births or actual number of times used. Go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/.

Today the 100 most popular names by individual state were revealed based on a 100 percent sample of Social Security number card applications. 

While having fun with baby names on www.socialsecurity.gov, consider creating your own my Social Security account to access your personal Social Security Statement and other services.

Shown here are the top ten male and female names nationally, and for North Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota. For any state, go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/babynames/state/index.html

 

 

 

 Smartphone Reminder:

Since early May, when visiting the Social Security Administration website, www.socialsecurity.gov, via smartphone (Android, Blackberry, iPhone, and Windows devices) you are redirected to the agency’s new mobile-friendly site. There you can access a mobile version of Social Security’s Frequently Asked Questions, an interactive Social Security number (SSN) decision tree to help identify documents needed for a new/replacement SSN card, and mobile publications which you can listen to in both English and Spanish.