When to report work for the annual earnings test

Q: I retired last year, started Social Security, and expect to work part-time this year on a fill-in basis. If I reach the retirement earning limit amount for the year, is it my responsibility to notify Social Security? Are benefits reduced for work immediately or resolved at years’ end. I am 63.

A: Yes, it is your responsibility to contact Social Security. Report your estimated earnings for the calendar year as soon as you think your earnings will exceed the annual limit for your age. You can provide updated estimates during the year as needed for changes up or down.

Providing an estimated earnings amount to Social Security is needed when you expect to earn more than your earnings limit amount during the calendar year. For example, at age 63 in 2015, you are under full retirement age (FRA) for the entire year and must provide an estimate if expected gross wage earnings will exceed $15,720. An estimate is not needed when annual earnings are expected to below the earnings limit.

Adjustments based on your estimated earnings will take place as soon as possible in order to avoid having you incorrectly paid. The usual suggestion to people expecting to earn over the annual limit for their age is to provide an estimate as accurate as possible, but to the high side.

Later, when you receive your W-2 form at the end of the year, report your actual earnings for the year directly to Social Security. Based on your actual earnings, final adjustments are made to either send you benefits due or to withhold those incorrectly paid.

A list of your various Social Security reporting responsibilities is in the booklet, What You Need to Know When You Get Retirement Or Survivors Benefits, available online. Work activity is a topic discussed over several pages of the booklet and an excerpt from page 17 includes:

“Your earnings estimate and your benefits

We adjusted your benefits this year based on the earnings you told us you expected to receive this year.

If other family members get benefits on your record, your earnings may affect the total family benefits. But, if you get benefits as a family member, your earnings affect only your benefits.”   

“Revising your earnings estimate

When you work, you should save your pay stubs. If during the year, you see your earnings will be different from what you estimated, you should call us to revise the estimate. This will help us pay you the correct amount of Social Security benefits.”  

More about working while receiving Social Security retirement or survivors benefits is here.

SSA Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014, available

The Social Security Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014, is available now.

Prepared annually since 1940, the Supplement is a major resource for data on our nation’s social insurance and welfare programs. The majority of the statistical tables present information about programs administered by the Social Security Administration—the Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program (OASDI), known collectively as Social Security, and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.

In addition, data are presented on the major health care programs—Medicare and Medicaid—and social insurance programs, including workers’ compensation, unemployment insurance, temporary disability insurance, Black Lung benefits, and veterans’ benefits. The Supplement also includes program summaries and legislative histories that help users of the data understand these programs.

There is a wealth of useful information in the Supplement. View the Table of Contents and find the topics of interest to you.

Here are some tidbits from the Highlights and Trends section:

Social Security:

About 58.0 million persons received Social Security benefits for December 2013, an increase of 1,220,425 (2.2 percent) since December 2012. Seventy percent were retired workers and their spouses and children, 11 percent were survivors of deceased workers, and 19 percent were disabled workers and their spouses and children.

  • Seventy-three percent of the 37.9 million retired workers received reduced benefits because of entitlement prior to full retirement age. Relatively more women (75.4 percent) than men (70.3 percent) received reduced benefits.

Supplemental Security Income:

  • In December 2013, 8,363,477 persons received federally administered SSI payments—100,600 more than the previous year. Of the total, 2,107,524 (25.2 percent) were aged 65 or older; 4,934,272 (59.0 percent) were blind or disabled aged 18–64; and 1,321,681 (15.8 percent) were blind or disabled under age 18.

Medicare:

Number of enrollees in July 2013 (one or both of Parts A and B)   52.4 million

Aged                                     43.6 million

Disabled                                   8.8 million

Unemployment: Total payments, 2012    $42.6 billion

Workers Compensation: Benefit payments, 2012  $61.8 billion

Veterans’ Benefits:

Number of veterans with disability compensation or pension, 2013

Service-connected disability                     3,734,000

Nonservice-connected disability                   305,000

Poverty Data:

Percentage of population with income below poverty level, 2013

All ages                                                              14.5 percent

Children under age 18 living in families              19.5 percent

Persons aged 65 or older                                     9.5 percent

2014 Statistical Report

Voluntary tax withholding from Social Security benefits

People filing application to start Social Security benefits often ask if taxes are withheld from their monthly payments. They are not. Taxes are not routinely withheld from Social Security benefits.

Especially during this time of year as people pay their Federal income tax, another popular question is whether taxes can voluntarily be withheld from Social Security payments. Yes, you can arrange this.

If desired, you can request voluntary Federal tax withholding from your monthly Social Security benefits. You may find doing this easier than paying quarterly estimated tax payments. See http://www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/taxwithold.htm.

To start voluntary Federal tax withholding you need to complete Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form W-4V, Voluntary Withholding Request, and return it to your local Social Security office. To change or end an ongoing voluntary withholding, complete another form W-4V.

Withholding is by your selected percentage of monthly benefits, not a flat dollar amount. When completing the W-4V you select the percentage of benefits for tax withholding. Available options are to have 7 percent, 10 percent, 15 percent or 25 percent of your monthly benefit withheld.

The Social Security Administration has no authority to withhold state or local taxes from your benefit. Voluntary withholding is only for Federal taxes.

Social Security employees cannot provide tax advice. If voluntary withholding interests you, discuss it with your tax preparer or call IRS at 1-800-829-3676 (TTY 1-800-829-4059). To start voluntary tax withholding, complete and provide IRS Form W-4V to your local Social Security office.

Average Social Security and SSI amounts in February 2015

For February 2015, following are three easily understood tables providing Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) information. These tables are online here.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a separate, low-income program for the aged over 65, disabled or blind children, and disabled or blind adults that is administered by the Social Security Administration. Since SSI is completely different from Social Security, a person meeting the individual rules for each could become eligible for both programs. Income from Social Security reduces SSI amounts.

Learn more about Social Security and SSI at www.socialsecurity.gov.

Table 1 shows the number of people, in thousands, receiving Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) divided by Social Security only, SSI only, and people receiving both.

The “notes” in table 1 explain the difference in total Social Security beneficiaries shown between table 1 and table 2.

2015-02 table 1

Table 2 shows Social Security benefit information for February 2015, separated by number of beneficiaries receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits. The number of beneficiaries is again shown in the thousands, with total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

Social Security was never intended to provide full retirement income and this table emphasizes that fact. In February 2015, the average SSA retirement benefit, for the retiree only and excluding any family benefits, was $1,331.44.

2015-02 table 2

Table 3 shows Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit information for February 2015, separated by number of recipients receiving specific types of benefits and the average dollar amount of those benefits.  As above, the number of recipients are shown in the thousands, total benefits shown in the millions and average amounts in dollars.

In February 2015, the average SSI amount was $539.61. The 2015 maximum payable to an eligible individual is $733 per month. This maximum is reduced by other income, including Social Security benefits.

2015-02 table 3

These tables are online here.

Changing a child’s representative payee

Q: My ex-wife receives Social Security disability benefits for herself plus benefits for our daughter, for whom she has custody. Within the next few months, I will have custody and our daughter will live with me full-time.

Will Social Security start sending benefits for her to me or will they continue going to my ex-wife? Will the amount change when she is living with me?

A: A person receiving benefits on behalf of someone else is their representative payee. As a general guideline, the parent with legal custody is the preferred payee compared to a parent without custody but exceptions exist based on individual situations.

Changing the representative payee for your daughter, or anyone, is not automatic. You will need to request a change by completing an application to be the new payee for your daughter. This is not an online application so contact your Social Security office to do this. Expect to prove that you have custody and that your daughter is living with you.

A worker’s, in this case your ex-wife, own Social Security amount is based on his or her earnings history over many years. Benefits to a child or other family member do not change how much the worker receives for himself or herself.

Assuming you become your daughter’s representative payee, with her benefits sent in your care, the individual Social Security benefit of your ex-wife will not change although she would no longer receive the amount for your daughter.

The Social Security benefit amount for a child is based on the earnings record of the worker and will be the same wherever the child is living.

Representative payees are responsible for using Social Security benefits on behalf of the eligible person. As representative payee, you will have to report how funds for your daughter are used. Other responsibilities include reporting if your daughter is no longer living with you. Details are in the Guide for Representative Payees.

Social Security testimony before Congress

As reported in the February edition of the Social Security newsletter, Acting Commissioner of Social Security Carolyn W. Colvin testified twice before Congress during February.

On February 11, she testified about the financial status of the Social Security Disability Insurance Trust Fund before the Senate Budget Committee.

Ms. Colvin asked for the Senate’s support for the President’s Budget request, which will reallocate .9 percent of payroll tax revenue from the Old-Age and Survivors trust fund to the Disability Insurance (DI) trust fund for 5 years. This action will keep the DI trust fund adequately financed and able to pay full benefits until 2033.

On February 26, she testified before the U.S. House Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Sub-Committee.

The topic of the hearing was “The Vital Responsibility of Serving the Nation’s Aging and Disabled Communities.” Ms. Colvin stressed that SSA continues to meet the many challenges facing the agency, such as our hearings backlog and hiring administrative law judges. We also continue to strengthen our disability program through activities such as our continuing disability reviews and Supplemental Security Income redeterminations. These activities save billions of program dollars and protect the integrity of our programs.

Direct links to her testimony are here, within the Social Security Office of Legislative and Congressional Affairs website section. In addition to links to testimony by Social Security officials, the section has more about legislation of the 114th Congress with provisions affecting Social Security.

Earnings test not just for retirement benefits

Q: Do the Social Security earnings limits apply just to retirement? Do they apply if receiving widow’s benefits?

A: Yes, earnings limits apply for survivor benefits. The annual earnings test applies individually to everyone younger than their full retirement age (FRA) unless that person receives benefits due to their own disability. People of all ages receive Social Security and the earnings test applies to many of them.

For examples, if both members of a couple receive Social Security retirement, the earnings test applies separately to each until full retirement age. The earnings test also applies to a child, not disabled, receiving benefits through a parents record whether the parent is retired, disabled or deceased.

The earnings test does not apply to people receiving benefits because of their own disability but it does apply to non-disabled family members, including spouse and children, receiving benefits through the disabled person’s record.

Many young people receive Social Security benefits. Earnings test amounts are the same whether SSA retirement, survivors or disability is involved. Different amounts can be earned during the calendar year before benefits are reduced based on if the person is under full retirement age (FRA) the entire year, reaches FRA during the year, or is already FRA. The earnings test ends when you reach FRA.

Based on year of birth, full retirement age ranges from 65 to 67. Retirement FRA is 66 for people born in 1943 – 1954. Note that FRA’s for survivors benefits are different from retirement FRA’s.

Earnings test details are here.

Separate earning rules and work incentives apply if you receive Social Security due to your own disability. Contact Social Security before returning to work. General information is here.

America Saves Week 2015

America Saves Week, February 23 – 28, 2015, reminds us all to focus on the importance of saving and investing for the future. The Social Security Administration is one of many public and private organizations participating in America Saves Week.

Steps toward achieving financial goals include saving, investing and planning throughout an entire career.

What is the status of your savings? According to the America Saves Week website, www.americasavesweek.org/, you should assess your savings annually to make sure you are saving for all the right things and it provides several questions to help you do this.

Someday you will want to retire. Prepare for it. Now is the perfect time to examine your saving habits. Are you on track for a comfortable retirement?

Estimate your future SSA retirement amount with the Social Security online Retirement Estimator, one part of the SSA Retirement Planner. The Estimator connects to your actual work record to provide a personal estimate. You can change the default estimates for those more in tune with your actual plans.

Create a my Social Security account and view your Social Security Statement. Along with your Social Security earnings record, the Statement provides estimated retirement amounts plus family benefits should you become disabled or die. This information helps you arrange other parts of your financial planning.

Social Security personnel cannot assist with financial planning. Select your own helpers for this. Two websites to help you get started are www.mymoney.gov, the official U.S. government website dedicated to teaching Americans the basics of finances, and the Ballpark Estimator at www.choosetosave.org/ballpark, part of the American Savings Education Council program, which includes the Social Security Administration.

These sites, and others like them, are not just about savings for retirement. There are reasons to save for every stage of life.

To help your planning, here is a Test Your Savings Knowledge question from the American Saves Week website:

Q: About how much more do families with a savings plan save than those without such a plan?

A: According to one study, if family incomes are the same, those families with a plan save about twice as much as those who do not have one.

Social Security launches new fraud facts webpage

The Social Security Administration has launched a new web page to highlight the agency’s many efforts in fighting fraud and protecting every worker’s investment in the Social Security program. See it at www.socialsecurity.gov/antifraudfacts. 

Visitors to this site get a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the hard work done every day to fight fraud, waste, and abuse in Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs.  

The website includes information on the tools used to fight fraud, spotlights some of highly successful anti-fraud efforts, and provides materials you can use to help spread the word that Social Security has zero tolerance for fraud. 

One of several links from this new fraud facts webpage is to the Social Security Office of Inspector General (OIG) webpage. The direct OIG link is http://oig.ssa.gov/ and it can also be easily reached through the “contact us” links on the Social Security homepage, www.socialsecurity.gov. From the “contact us” page, click on “Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse.” 

The OIG website has lots of information including some situations, with examples, that may be considered as fraud, waste or abuse against the Social Security administration. You can report possible fraud situations there and read about some recent investigations.

Update – replacement 1099 for 2014

Replacement 1099’s for 2014 are now available online. The way to get one is different from past years. 

When a 1099 replacement was previously requested online, it was mailed to the person’s address as shown on Social Security records. Receipt would take about 10 business days. 

Now, replacement 1099’s are available as a new service for people with a my Social Security account. Through your my Social Security account, the 1099 is available for downloading as a pdf for immediate printing or saving as a file. There is also be an option to have it mailed as in past years. 

Create your personal my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/.