Working And Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

On April 23, I posted about returning to work when receiving Social Security disability. Special rules called work incentives make it possible for people with disabilities, whether receiving Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), to work and still receive monthly payments and Medicare or Medicaid.

Returning to the topic, today I will mention one of the work incentives when receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Since SSI is very different from Social Security, the work incentives are different too. SSI involves cash assistance payments to aged, blind and disabled people (including children under age 18) who have limited income and resources. The Federal government pays for SSI from general tax revenues, not Social Security money.

If receiving both Social Security and SSI, you need to follow the separate rules for each program. To discuss your own benefits, speak to a Social Security representative.

Always report a return to work. This is very important. Also report related changes including stopping the work. 

A very basic Supplemental Security Income (SSI) work incentive is the exclusion of some employment income when figuring out the amount of a monthly SSI payment.

When working, the first $65 of earnings received in a month do not count, plus one-half of the remaining earnings. This means that less than one-half of your earnings are counted against your SSI payment amount.

For an example of how this works, use gross wages of $165 received in a month. Not counting the first $65 dollars leaves $100 remaining. Then, not counting an additional one-half of this $100 remaining amount leaves only $50 to reduce the overall SSI amount. In this example of the earned income exclusion work incentive, of the received $165 wages in the month, $115 is not used to lower benefits.

People receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) usually report their earnings on a monthly basis to keep benefit amounts accurate.  Discuss how to do this when reporting a return to work.

Referring to the post of April 23, when a person receiving SSI returns to work, the Social Security trial work period (TWP) or concept of substantial gainful activity (SGA) do not apply. To restate, if you receive both Social Security and SSI, you need to follow the separate rules for each program.

Only one SSI work incentive was mentioned today. Many other work incentives can apply. To discuss your own benefits, speak to a Social Security representative.

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