Open Government, Social Security, OIG and You

The Social Security Administration website has a section devoted to the open government initiative (http://ssa.gov/open/index.html).   

More than benefit information, a lot of Social Security material is there including research, budget and finance information, and actuarial data. You can also view public service announcements, order publications and watch webinars.

Today, I am highlighting the Open Government News section. Topics posted there during a month have a short introduction with links for more information.

Posted in early January was notice of the SSA Office of the Inspector General’s (OIG) 2012 Fall Semiannual Report to Congress, covering the period April – September 2012.  

While this straightforward name might not set off fireworks, the report includes the organization’s most significant audit, investigative, and legal accomplishments, providing a glimpse of agency activity not often seen by the public.

Many specific examples of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income fraud investigations are included.  

 From the reports Executive Summary:

“During this reporting period, we received 71,867 allegations from SSA employees, the Congress, the public, law enforcement agencies, and other sources. Our agents closed 4,029 criminal investigations, resulting in 269 arrests, 637 indictments and informations, 706 criminal convictions (including pretrial diversions) and 118 civil judgments/civil monetary penalty (CMP) assessments.”

“In the second half of FY2012, we are reporting over $248 million in monetary accomplishments, including over $50 million in SSA recoveries, restitution, fines, settlements, and judgments; and over $197 million in projected savings from investigations resulting in the suspension or termination of benefits. In addition, we participated in multi-agency investigations that resulted in over $30 million in savings, restitution, and recoveries for other agencies.”

Through very important, SSA Office of the Inspector General (OIG) activity is not usually seen by the public. This report is worth a few minutes of your time.

Open government is for you. 

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