Social Security Twitter Chat today at 1:30 p.m. EDT

As part of National my Social SecurityWeek, the Social Security Administration is hosting its first Twitter Chat, titled #mySocialSecurity: Planning for Your Financial Future today August 21, 2014 from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. EDT

Joining will be the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Federal Trade Commission.

During the Twitter Chat, you can ask questions relating to the topic using the hashtag #mySocialSecurity.

This week the Social Security Administration hopes to educate the public about the benefits of having a my Social Security account.

Individuals can use their my Social Security accounts to access their Social Security Statements to check their earnings and get estimates of future Social Security benefits.

People already receiving Social Security benefits can get benefit verification letters, change their address and phone number, and start or change their direct deposit information.

Participate in the my Social Security Twitter Chat today, Thursday August 21, 2014, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. EDT.

Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount and create your my Social Security account today.

National my Social Security Week

If you receive Social Security benefits or have Medicare, you can use a mySocial Security online account to:

1. Get your benefit verification letter;

2. Check your benefit and payment information and your earnings record;

3. Change your address and phone number; and

4.Start or change direct deposit of your benefit payment.

 If you do not receive benefits, you can use a mySocial Security online account to:

A) Get yourSocial Security Statement to review:

          1) Estimates of your future retirement, disability, and survivors benefits;

          2) Your earnings once a year to verify the amounts we posted are correct and see the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid.

B) Get a benefit verification letter stating that:

          1) You never received Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicare; or

          2) You received benefits in the past, but do not currently receive them or

          3) You applied for benefits but haven’t received an answer yet.

Get your free personal online my Social Security account today! http://www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/

 

Frances Perkins

Following up on yesterday’s 79th anniversary of the Social Security legislation, here is a composite photograph of President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the Social Security Act on August 14, 1935.

Standing in a position of importance immediately behind FDR, there is one woman in the photograph. Who is she? Frances Perkins, Secretary of Labor, and very important in the history of Social Security.

In 1933, Franklin Roosevelt appointed Ms. Perkins as his Secretary of Labor, a position she held for twelve years, longer than any other Secretary of Labor and making her the first woman to hold a cabinet position in the United States.

As Secretary of Labor she played a key role writing New Deal legislation, including minimum wage laws. However, her most important contribution came in 1934 as chairwoman of the President’s Committee on Economic Security, the committee instructed to study the entire problem of economic insecurity and to make recommendations that would serve as the basis for legislative consideration by the Congress.

As chairwoman of this committee, Frances Perkins was involved in all aspects of the reports and hearings that ultimately resulted in the Social Security Act of 1935. 

Read about Frances Perkins here 

The history section of the Social Security website is at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/history/index.html.

 

 

Planning for Someday with the SSA retirement planner

Planning for retirement, including learning the basics of Social Security, should begin well before you actually retire.  

Based on the questions I receive, advance planning is not always done. 

Lots of SSA retirement planning information is on the Social Security website, www.socialsecurity.gov, in the Retirement Benefits section and especially in the Retirement Planner area at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/retire2/.  

 Here is a partial list of Retirement Planner topics:

     Finding your retirement age (full retirement age – FRA)

     Estimating your retirement benefits and other calculators

     Working after retirement

     Discover your retirement options

     Benefits for family members

     Needed documents

     Online retirement application

     Applying just for Medicare

 Someday you will want to retire. Start planning today to make someday possible.

Mid-year retirement and the annual earnings test

Q: I have been working all year and will retire soon. Does Social Security start counting my wages with the day I start retirement or from the beginning of the year? Can I start Social Security retirement now or must I wait until 2015 due to my earnings? 

A: If you are at least age 62 and meet all requirements, start Social Security retirement when you want, whether this year after you retire, in 2015, or some other time.  

Your question refers to the annual retirement earnings test. Earnings for the retirement test include your calendar year gross wages and net income from self-employment. Other income is not included for the earnings test. 

People retire all during the year. Since those retiring mid-year might have already earned over earnings test levels for the year, there is a special one-time rule, usually used during the first year of retirement, that lets people receive Social Security retirement benefits based on monthly earnings. Using this one-time exception, you should be able to start SSA retirement when you retire despite your total earnings for this year.

Based on this one-time rule, a person retiring in 2014, at least age 62 but younger than full retirement age the entire year, can receive Social Security retirement for months that gross wages do not exceed $1,290 even though overall calendar year earnings are far above retirement test amounts. Slightly different rules apply for self-employment.   

Earnings test amounts for 2015 are not yet known, but 2014 information is here 

What is your Someday?

The newest Social Security Update became available today and includes a section, partially reprinted here, about a time that everyone seems to look forward to – Someday – and how you can help plan for yours.

From the Update newsletter: 

For many people, Someday is an elusive day on the far-off horizon—always seeming close enough to see, but too distant to touch. Perhaps Someday you plan to go skydiving. Or enter a hot dog-eating contest. Maybe Someday you plan to ride a mechanical bull. Or travel around the world. Or visit all of America’s national parks.

Someday, you will want to retire. If you are mid-career, Someday, you will need to start planning for retirement. Even if you are just now starting your career, Someday you’re going to want to see what your future Social Security benefits will be and check your earnings for accuracy. Someday has arrived. Open a my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount, and you’ll see what we mean. 

Millions of people have opened a my Social Security account, and our Someday campaign will help millions more learn about my Social Security and sign up for their free online account. Someone opens a new account just about every six seconds. 

Watch our new Public Service Announcement at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

 

SSI Recipients by State and County, 2013

Last week I posted information about the annual publication OASDI Beneficiaries by State and County, 2013, containing Social Security beneficiary information to the individual county level.

Newly released is the publication SSI Recipients By State and County, 2013, containing local area data for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.  

Administered by the Social Security Administration, but very different from Social Security, SSI is a cash assistance program providing monthly benefits to low-income aged, blind, or disabled people, including children.

People can receive both Social Security and SSI if the individual program requirements are met. SSI Recipients By State and County, 2013 shows the number of SSI recipient’s also receiving Social Security (OASDI) benefits.

When looking up your state or county information, note that benefit amounts are shown in thousands of dollars.

Anniversary of Medicare legislation

On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed H.R. 6675 to provide health insurance for the elderly. It was signed in Independence, Missouri, in the presence of Harry S. Truman who opened the fight for such legislation in a message to Congress in 1945.

The Social Security website history section contains information about the development of Medicare. Much of this information is from there

“Lack of adequate protection for the aged against the cost of health care was the major gap in the protection of the social insurance system in 1963. Meeting this need of the aged was given top priority by President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Administration, and a year and a half after he took office this objective was achieved when a new program, “Medicare,” was established by the 1965 amendments to the social security program. 

The special economic problem which stimulated the development of Medicare is that health costs increase greatly in old age when, at the same time, income almost always declines. The cost of adequate private health insurance, if paid for in old age, is more than most older persons can afford. Prior to Medicare, only a little over one-half of those aged 65 and over had some type of hospital insurance; few among the insured group had insurance covering any part of their surgical and out-of-hospital physicians’ costs. Also, there were numerous instances where private insurance companies were terminating health policies for aged persons in the high risk category.”

Most of the new Medicare program became effective July 1, 1966. It included two related health insurance plans for persons aged 65 and over. These were a hospital insurance plan (Part A) providing protection against the costs of hospital and related care, and a supplementary medical insurance plan (Part B) covering payments for physicians’ services and other medical and health services to cover certain areas not covered by the hospital insurance plan.

General information about Medicare as it is today, go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/medicare/

Detailed Medicare coverage information is at http://www.medicare.gov/

Here is a Medicare poster from 1965:

 

 

 

Social Security disability, retirement or both?

Q: My brother is 64 years old but in poor health even though he still works full-time. His doctors are telling him to retire. The doctors say he should qualify for disability. What would be the best for him? Social Security or disability? 

A: Just to be clear, retirement, survivors and disability benefits are all Social Security, just different parts. 

Social Security disability information is here. Your brother should especially look at the Disability Planner section. 

Since the disability definition for Social Security purposes is based on ability to work, not just health, it is unlikely that a disability application by your brother would be approved as long as he continues working full-time, assuming no employer subsidy or special considerations that allow him to work. 

In general, if working in 2014 and having earnings that average more than $1,070 a month, a person cannot be considered disabled. Usually disability clients file for benefits after they stop working or have greatly reduced work activity. With that, the decision to file or not is his.  

Only your brother can decide what is best for him. He can file an application for Social Security disability or retirement. Disability benefits are not reduced for age. Retirement benefits are reduced for age if started when the person is younger than full retirement age (FRA).

Since your brother is at least the minimum SSA retirement age of 62, another available option is for him to file for both disability and retirement (reduced for age) benefits at the same time. 

If he does this, retirement benefits could be received while the disability application is pending. If disability is not approved, his retirement benefits continue at the reduced rate. If the disability application is approved, the benefit amount is reviewed and increased although not to 100 percent. Final amounts would be based on the number of months that he received a reduced retirement.